Installing the Wacom Intuos Pro PTH-651 under Ubuntu 13.10

As a present to myself for getting a high distinction while studying my IT Masters, I decided to get a reasonable graphics tablet. As a hobbyist graphic designer and photographer, it was an area I was keen to develop skills in. In determining which model to buy, Wacom was really the only choice – they are the undisputed market leader in this space. The Bamboo range wasn’t function enough for what I wanted, so opted for the mid-range Intuos Pro model, the PTH-651.

The lovely folks at BCC Computers in Geelong put one on backorder (apparently they’re really popular, they kept chasing for me, which was great) and within a couple of weeks I had the device in my hot little hands. It’s just as well that it arrived after linux.conf.au 2014, otherwise I wouldn’t have packed for conf!

The other complication was that I had a Masters’ assignment due; my wonderful work colleague T played Dad and ‘kept it safe’ for me for the week or so until the assignment was finished; then my toy got released! Thanks, T 🙂

Installation under Windows

The tablet installed beautifully under both Windows 8, my home machine, and my work laptop running Win 7 Professional. In both cases I had to reboot, but the software installed easily and immediately I was able to use it.

Getting it installed under Ubuntu 13.10 Saucy Salamander

Installation under Ubuntu was a little more tricky. The good folk at BCC had warned me that I would have to use this difficult thing called the ‘command line’ when I made initial enquiries; this was where I pulled out the photo of my “other” Nexus 4 running Ubuntu Touch and demonstrated this was probably within my capability!

Nexus 4 runnung Ubuntu Touch

I was not to be deterred.

So, after unpacking and installing the Intuos under Windows, I booted into Ubuntu and set to work. Initially, there was nothing. Not even a hesistant jitter from the cursor to indicate it knew of the Intuos, and the Intuos knew of it.

After some reading on the Ubuntu forums, I happened across instructions for downloading, compiling and installing the latest version of the Wacom drivers, from the Linux Wacom project. I’d had mixed results backporting previously, like when I had to backport the Atheros ethernet drivers into my ASUS N76.

This time, fortune was on my side. The new drivers installed perfectly and after a reboot, my Intuos was recognised, and the (still somewhat limited, but vastly improved) control panel was in System Settings.

Mission: accomplished

Other thoughts

Everything about this install was intuitive, other than for changing the nibs on the stylus, which Wacom had helpfully done a video of.

Will my mouse be gone foreover? I’m not sure. Going entirely to the tablet takes a little time and practise, but just like learning a language it’s a skill I’d like to get some more fluency in. I still have a lot to learn with swipes and other gestures, but for now I’m off to a flying start.