My talk picks for #lca2017 – linux.conf.au

linux.conf.au 2017 heads to Hobart, where it was last held in 2009. I absolutely love Tasmania – especially its food and scenery – and am looking forward to heading over.

So, here’s my talk picks  – keeping in mind that I’m more devops than kernel hacker – so YMMV.

Executive Summary

  • Monday 16th – Networking breakfast, possibly some WootConf sessions and / or Open Knowledge Miniconf sessions.
  • Tuesday 17th – Law and policy Miniconf, Community Leadership Summit
  • Wednesday 18th – Future Privacy by Michael Cordover, In Case of Emergency – Break Glass by David Bell, Handle Conflict Like a Boss by Deb Nicholson, Internet of Terrible Things by Matthew Garrett.
  • Thursday 19th – Network Protocols for IoT Devices by Jon Oxer, Compliance with the GPL by Karen Sandler and Bradley M. Kuhn, Open source and innovation by Allison Randall and Surviving the next 30 years of open source by Karen Sandler.
  • Friday 20th – Publicly releasing government models by Audrey Lobo-Pulo

Monday 16th January

I’m keeping Monday open as much as possible, in case there are last minute things we need to do for the Linux Australia AGM, but will definitely start the day with the Opening Reception and Networking Breakfast. A networking breakfast is an unusual choice of format for the Professional Delegates Networking Session (PDNS), but I can see some benefits to it such as being able to initiate key relationships and talking points early in the conference. The test of course will be attendance, and availability of tasty coffee 😀

If I get a chance I’ll see some of the WootConf sessions and/or Open Knowledge Miniconf sessions (the Open Knowledge Miniconf schedule hadn’t been posted at the time of writing).

Tuesday 17th January

The highlight for me in Tuesday’s schedule is the excellent Pia Waugh talking ‘Choose your own Adventure‘. This talk is based on Waugh’s upcoming book, and the philosophical foundations, macroeconomic implications and strategic global trends cover a lot of ground – ground that needs to be covered.

As of the time of writing, the schedule for the Law and Policy Miniconf hadn’t been released, but this area is of interest to me – as is the Community Leadership Summit. I’m interested to see how the Community Leadership Summit is structured this year; in 2015 it had a very unconference feel. This was appropriate for the session at the time, but IMHO what the Community Leadership Summit needs to move towards are concrete deliverables – such as say a whitepaper advising Linux Australia Council on where efforts should be targeted in the year ahead. In this way, the Summit would be able to have a tangible, clear impact.

Wednesday 18th January

I’ll probably head to Dan Callahan’s keynote on ‘Designing for failure’. It’s great to see Jonathan Corbet’s Kernel Report get top billing, but my choice here is between the ever-excellent Michael Codover’s ‘Future Privacy‘ and Cedric Bail’s coverage of ‘Enlightenment Foundation Libraries for Wearables‘. Next up, I’ll be catching David Bell (Director, LCA2016) talking ‘In case of emergency – break glass – BCP, DRP and Digital Legacy‘. There’s nothing compelling for me in the after lunch session, except perhaps Josh Simmon’s ‘Building communities beyond the black stump‘, but this one’s probably too entry-level for me, so it might be a case of long lunch / hallway track.

After afternoon tea, I’ll likely head to Deb Nicholson’s ‘Handle conflict like a boss‘, and then Matthew Garett‘s ‘Internet of terrible things‘ – because Matthew Garrett 😀

Then, it will be time for the Penguin Dinner!

Thursday 19th January

First up, I’m really looking forward to Nadia Eghbal’s ‘People before code‘ keynote about the sustainability of open source projects.

Jon Oxer’s ‘Network Protocol Analysis for IoT Devices‘ is really appealing, particularly given the rise and rise of IoT equipment, and the lack of standards in this space.

It might seem like a dry topic for some, but Bradley M. Kuhn and Karen Sandler from the Software Freedom Conservancy will be able to breathe life into ‘Compliance with the GPL‘ if anyone can; they also bring with them considerable credibility on the topic.

After lunch, I’ll be catching Allison Randall talking on ‘Open source and innovation‘ and then Karen Sandler on ‘Surviving the next 30 years of open source‘. These talks are related, and speak to the narrative of how open source is evolving into different facets of our lives – how does open source live on when we do not?

Friday 20th January

After the keynote, I’ll be catching Audrey Lobo-Pulo on ‘Publicly releasing government models‘ – this ties in with a lot of the work I’ve been doing in open data, and government open data in particular. After lunch, I’m looking forward to James Scheibner’s ‘Guide to FOSS licenses‘, and to finish off the conference on a high note, the ever-erudite and visionary George Fong on ‘Defending the security and integrity of the ‘Net’. Internet Australia, of which Fong is the chair, has many values in common with Linux Australia, and I foresee the two organisations working more closely together in the future.

What are your picks for #lca2017?

linux.conf.au 2016 Geelong – LCA By the Bay

So, it’s been about six weeks now since linux.conf.au 2016 Geelong – LCA By the Bay concluded, and after a lot of sleep and catching up, it’s about time to pen some thoughts about the process, the experience and learnings.

Getting linux.conf.au to Geelong

When you think ‘epicentre of opensource’, Geelong is not what comes to mind. Well, it’s not what used to come to mind! So, how did we bring linux.conf.au to Geelong?

Late 2013

Firstly, we needed some core people to put a bid together. David Bell and I had worked on BarCampGeelong before, and had semi-seriously considered bidding previously. We felt that we had a complementary set of skills, and the drive, leadership and passion to make it happen.

We worked with Business Events Geelong, and the wonderful Terry Hickey, to put together a bid document, covering key aspects of what linux.conf.au in Geelong would look like. Business Events Geelong were able to assist with a professional bid document template, and with sourcing pricing to include in the bid document. A couple of hours later, and we had formally submitted our bid to host linux.conf.au!

linux-conf-au-geelong-bid (PDF, 1.5 Mb)

linux.conf.au is chosen by a committee of trusted senior members of Linux Australia, the organisation that umbrellas linux.conf.au and a stable of other events, such as PyconAU, Open Source Developers Conference and a number of WordCamp and Drupal events in Australia. Linux Australia calls for expressions of interest from teams interested in running linux.conf.au every year – bids – and forms a small committee to evaluate the submissions. This normally involves travelling to the bid city, and assessing elements such as;

  • accommodation
  • conference venue
  • transport to and from the conference
  • conference event locations

April 2014

Terry and the Business Events team were amazing at hosting the bid team, and showcased a number of Geelong’s leisure and recreation offerings, cementing the quality of our bid. It was a great opportunity to learn from the bid team, as they assessed our risk management, our planning and our ability to pull together such a large event.

Venue visit for #lca2015 #geelong. Beautiful.

A photo posted by @kathyreid_id_au on


Although Auckland were awarded linux.conf.au for the year ahead (2015), the decision was made to award Geelong linux.conf.au 2 years out. This was an excellent decision, and provided long term stability not only to the event, but also provided the conference team with a longer term planning horizon.

Woo! We won a bid for linux.conf.au! Now what?!

Once we had a strong idea of how the main conference venue (Deakin University’s Waterfront Campus) would work, we focussed our efforts on preparing to showcase Geelong as an outstanding venue at linux.conf.au 2015 in Auckland. Often, the next year’s conference prepares promotional material or flyers to help encourage conference attendees. We had decided on our conference theme of

life is better with linux

and in keeping with the theme, worked with Martin Print to have NFC keyrings printed.

Now the hard work began. Firstly, we needed to ensure that our conference management system was functional. linux.conf.au traditionally runs on a piece of software called ZooKeepr, and it needs a bit of maintenance each year. Luckily, we had Josh Stewart and James Iseppi to give us a bit of a hand, and with David Bell being generally awesome with anything technical, in no time we were able to get ZooKeepr ready for the Call for Papers.

Call for Papers (#CfP)

The Call for Papers (#CfP) happens about 6 months before the conference, and the challenging part for conference organisers is ensuring not only that there are a large volume of submissions, but that the quality of submissions is of a quality fit for an internationally renowned conference. One of the ways in which the conference spreads the word about #CfP far and wide is to reach out to all past Speakers of linux.conf.au and encourage them to make submissions. We also lean heavily on the Papers Committee, the group of senior and respected Linux Australia members who review the #CfP submissions and make recommendations to the conference team on which submissions should be accepted into the conference.

This year, the conference team decided to add another type of submission to the mix – Prototypes – alongside the standard 45-minute Presentation and 110-minute Tutorial. This worked out wonderfully and some of the most popular talks of the whole conference were submitted as Prototypes – including the crowd-favourite Linux-powered microwave by David Tulloh.

Thanks to the efforts of Papers Committee and past Speakers, we received almost 300 submissions, and the overall quality was excellent. The Papers Committee spent a day in Sydney in in August making some very tough decisions, and after around 10 hours we had our Schedule! I was incredibly impressed by the talent in the room, and the generosity of the Papers Committee to give up their time – and in many cases their own coin – to travel and attend.

Schwag

While I was busy liaising with Speakers and getting travel organised, and David was busy with event venues for our conference events, Sae Ra Germaine was being a superstar with our schwag. She found an excellent supplier for our conference bags, Ecosilk, and designed a contemporary yet simple t-shirt for our delegates (navy) and volunteers (orange). She also worked to ensure that we had sunscreen  and hand sanitiser as part of the Schwag bag.

#lca2016 all tired out.

A photo posted by ms_mary_mac (@ms_mary_mac) on

Sponsors

David took a strong leadership role in Sponsorship, and developed a Sponsorship Prospectus, and negotiated sponsorship agreements with all of our fabulous sponsors. Many of our Sponsors support linux.conf.au year after year – without them, the conference wouldn’t happen. One of the challenges the conference has is having to re-establish sponsor relationships year after year, and our Ghosts debrief session and good documentation helps to ensure continuity.

Venue and catering

Deakin University’s Waterfront Campus and Costa Hall are beautiful architecturally, and provide a wonderful environment for collaboration and learning. However, the campus cannot hold 600 conference delegates in a 5 stream conference easily. So, we worked with the National Wool Museum, located a block away from Deakin, who had a conference room available. Another benefit of this arrangement was that delegates were able to see the jacquard loom – programmed via punch cards that the Museum had in their collection.

Patching a bug on a two story high computer. #lca2016

A photo posted by John Dalton (@varrqnuht) on

We worked with Waterfront Kitchen to arrange lunch options for delegates, and arranged to have menus placed in the Schwag bag. WFK also handled all catering for the conference, including morning and afternoon teas. We also made the decision to have core team and volunteer lunches fully catered, so that we could free up time during the busy conference period, and this proved to be a wise choice. We received nothing but positive feedback from our delegates regarding WFK’s catering – the variety, the attention to detail and handling of special dietary requirements.

By November, organisation of event venues was in full swing. linux.conf.au has three traditional conference events – Speakers Dinner, Professional Delegates’ Network Session (PDNS) and the main conference dinner, the Penguin Dinner. Speakers Dinner was held at the fabulous Balmoral at Fyansford, with the Limoncello String Quartet for music.

PDNS was held at the fabulous Little Creatures Brewery, and it was perfect. Great beer, great food and great company. It was amazing to see over 300 people of linux and opensource having a great night out.

 

Our Penguin Dinner was at the fabulous The Pier restaurant, and was an amazing night out for all concerned.

AV and Networking

A great conference needs great AV and networking, and we were fortunate to have some wonderful people, including Andrew and Steven working with us. The networking crew laid over 200m of fibre optic to the Wool Museum so that they could have solid internet, and we utilised the services of AARnet for our on-campus networking. Deakin University also provided phenomenal support, working with AARNet to provide strong wireless across the conference venues.

A great team

There were so many different parts of linux.conf.au that had to come together to make it an excellent conference, and the entire team needs to take credit for that. Aaron, who co-ordinated our childcare arrangements, which was greatly appreciated by attendees, Brittany whose excellent accountancy skills kept us very well budgeted, Michael whose social media prowess ensured we trended nationally, George who provided a helping hand where it was needed, Erin who was our Rego super-hero, Josh who helped us keep ZooKeepr and our payment gateway under control, Daniel our stellar volunteer co-ordinator and Brett whose photographic talents and video production blew us away – every single person was part of an amazing, productive, motivated and awesome team that I was so incredibly proud to be a part of.

LCA2016 - Wednesday

My must see list for #lca2014 linux.conf.au 2014

So, another year has sped around and it’s almost time to head to Perth for linux.conf.au 2014. The schedule has been up for a while so I have no excuse for not yet posting my must-see list.

Kathy’s must see #lca2014 list
Day Highlights
Monday Not being a hardcore sysadmin person, I’m really interested in the OpenGov miniconf, and what it has to offer open source communities in terms of opening up access to government data; but moreover making a difference to the open source mindset of government. Props Pia Waugh for running the miniconf. The Continuous Integration miniconf, run by Stewart Smith, will be worth a look but I’d like to see what’s on the schedule first. Automation of tests and test-driven development is a hot topic, and I’m interested to see what these practices have to offer multimedia and front end production as well as back end development.
Tuesday Haecksen, run by Lana Brindley, is always worth a look, but the schedule isn’t up yet. I’m intending to have a look at Jonathan Woithe’s music and multimedia conference, particularly Silvia Pfeiffer’s talk on node.js and the talk on web animations (which I’m presuming might cover SVG, HTML, JS and CSS).
Wednesday First up, Adam Harvey can talk to me about anything. He’s a brilliant presenter, and I love to learn more about where Android is headed. Writing documentation is fun, so I’ll go to that one too. Then I’ll catch the talk on HTTP 2.0 by Mark Nottingham and then the excellent Karen Sandler’s talk on bringing more women to open source. In the afternoon I’ll catch Pia Waugh on opening government data, and then Deborah Kaplan’s talk on accessible content. Then it will be time for the Linux Australia AGM, where I’ll need to take minutes.
Thursday Thursday morning might be a sleep in, but if I’m up it will be Ashe Dryden on Diversity and @codemiller on Elixir. Nothing really appeals to me for the rest of Thursday.. might go do something social or hallway track it instead.
Friday Friday morning will be Building APIs and VisualEditor for Wikipedia, then Alice Boxhall’s talk on Accessibility and TCP tuning for the web by Jason Cook. Totally bummed that Josh Stewart’s talk on engine hacking is up against VisualEditor.