linux.conf.au 2016 Geelong – LCA By the Bay

So, it’s been about six weeks now since linux.conf.au 2016 Geelong – LCA By the Bay concluded, and after a lot of sleep and catching up, it’s about time to pen some thoughts about the process, the experience and learnings.

Getting linux.conf.au to Geelong

When you think ‘epicentre of opensource’, Geelong is not what comes to mind. Well, it’s not what used to come to mind! So, how did we bring linux.conf.au to Geelong?

Late 2013

Firstly, we needed some core people to put a bid together. David Bell and I had worked on BarCampGeelong before, and had semi-seriously considered bidding previously. We felt that we had a complementary set of skills, and the drive, leadership and passion to make it happen.

We worked with Business Events Geelong, and the wonderful Terry Hickey, to put together a bid document, covering key aspects of what linux.conf.au in Geelong would look like. Business Events Geelong were able to assist with a professional bid document template, and with sourcing pricing to include in the bid document. A couple of hours later, and we had formally submitted our bid to host linux.conf.au!

linux-conf-au-geelong-bid (PDF, 1.5 Mb)

linux.conf.au is chosen by a committee of trusted senior members of Linux Australia, the organisation that umbrellas linux.conf.au and a stable of other events, such as PyconAU, Open Source Developers Conference and a number of WordCamp and Drupal events in Australia. Linux Australia calls for expressions of interest from teams interested in running linux.conf.au every year – bids – and forms a small committee to evaluate the submissions. This normally involves travelling to the bid city, and assessing elements such as;

  • accommodation
  • conference venue
  • transport to and from the conference
  • conference event locations

April 2014

Terry and the Business Events team were amazing at hosting the bid team, and showcased a number of Geelong’s leisure and recreation offerings, cementing the quality of our bid. It was a great opportunity to learn from the bid team, as they assessed our risk management, our planning and our ability to pull together such a large event.

Venue visit for #lca2015 #geelong. Beautiful.

A photo posted by @kathyreid_id_au on


Although Auckland were awarded linux.conf.au for the year ahead (2015), the decision was made to award Geelong linux.conf.au 2 years out. This was an excellent decision, and provided long term stability not only to the event, but also provided the conference team with a longer term planning horizon.

Woo! We won a bid for linux.conf.au! Now what?!

Once we had a strong idea of how the main conference venue (Deakin University’s Waterfront Campus) would work, we focussed our efforts on preparing to showcase Geelong as an outstanding venue at linux.conf.au 2015 in Auckland. Often, the next year’s conference prepares promotional material or flyers to help encourage conference attendees. We had decided on our conference theme of

life is better with linux

and in keeping with the theme, worked with Martin Print to have NFC keyrings printed.

Now the hard work began. Firstly, we needed to ensure that our conference management system was functional. linux.conf.au traditionally runs on a piece of software called ZooKeepr, and it needs a bit of maintenance each year. Luckily, we had Josh Stewart and James Iseppi to give us a bit of a hand, and with David Bell being generally awesome with anything technical, in no time we were able to get ZooKeepr ready for the Call for Papers.

Call for Papers (#CfP)

The Call for Papers (#CfP) happens about 6 months before the conference, and the challenging part for conference organisers is ensuring not only that there are a large volume of submissions, but that the quality of submissions is of a quality fit for an internationally renowned conference. One of the ways in which the conference spreads the word about #CfP far and wide is to reach out to all past Speakers of linux.conf.au and encourage them to make submissions. We also lean heavily on the Papers Committee, the group of senior and respected Linux Australia members who review the #CfP submissions and make recommendations to the conference team on which submissions should be accepted into the conference.

This year, the conference team decided to add another type of submission to the mix – Prototypes – alongside the standard 45-minute Presentation and 110-minute Tutorial. This worked out wonderfully and some of the most popular talks of the whole conference were submitted as Prototypes – including the crowd-favourite Linux-powered microwave by David Tulloh.

Thanks to the efforts of Papers Committee and past Speakers, we received almost 300 submissions, and the overall quality was excellent. The Papers Committee spent a day in Sydney in in August making some very tough decisions, and after around 10 hours we had our Schedule! I was incredibly impressed by the talent in the room, and the generosity of the Papers Committee to give up their time – and in many cases their own coin – to travel and attend.

Schwag

While I was busy liaising with Speakers and getting travel organised, and David was busy with event venues for our conference events, Sae Ra Germaine was being a superstar with our schwag. She found an excellent supplier for our conference bags, Ecosilk, and designed a contemporary yet simple t-shirt for our delegates (navy) and volunteers (orange). She also worked to ensure that we had sunscreen  and hand sanitiser as part of the Schwag bag.

#lca2016 all tired out.

A photo posted by ms_mary_mac (@ms_mary_mac) on

Sponsors

David took a strong leadership role in Sponsorship, and developed a Sponsorship Prospectus, and negotiated sponsorship agreements with all of our fabulous sponsors. Many of our Sponsors support linux.conf.au year after year – without them, the conference wouldn’t happen. One of the challenges the conference has is having to re-establish sponsor relationships year after year, and our Ghosts debrief session and good documentation helps to ensure continuity.

Venue and catering

Deakin University’s Waterfront Campus and Costa Hall are beautiful architecturally, and provide a wonderful environment for collaboration and learning. However, the campus cannot hold 600 conference delegates in a 5 stream conference easily. So, we worked with the National Wool Museum, located a block away from Deakin, who had a conference room available. Another benefit of this arrangement was that delegates were able to see the jacquard loom – programmed via punch cards that the Museum had in their collection.

Patching a bug on a two story high computer. #lca2016

A photo posted by John Dalton (@varrqnuht) on

We worked with Waterfront Kitchen to arrange lunch options for delegates, and arranged to have menus placed in the Schwag bag. WFK also handled all catering for the conference, including morning and afternoon teas. We also made the decision to have core team and volunteer lunches fully catered, so that we could free up time during the busy conference period, and this proved to be a wise choice. We received nothing but positive feedback from our delegates regarding WFK’s catering – the variety, the attention to detail and handling of special dietary requirements.

By November, organisation of event venues was in full swing. linux.conf.au has three traditional conference events – Speakers Dinner, Professional Delegates’ Network Session (PDNS) and the main conference dinner, the Penguin Dinner. Speakers Dinner was held at the fabulous Balmoral at Fyansford, with the Limoncello String Quartet for music.

PDNS was held at the fabulous Little Creatures Brewery, and it was perfect. Great beer, great food and great company. It was amazing to see over 300 people of linux and opensource having a great night out.

 

Our Penguin Dinner was at the fabulous The Pier restaurant, and was an amazing night out for all concerned.

AV and Networking

A great conference needs great AV and networking, and we were fortunate to have some wonderful people, including Andrew and Steven working with us. The networking crew laid over 200m of fibre optic to the Wool Museum so that they could have solid internet, and we utilised the services of AARnet for our on-campus networking. Deakin University also provided phenomenal support, working with AARNet to provide strong wireless across the conference venues.

A great team

There were so many different parts of linux.conf.au that had to come together to make it an excellent conference, and the entire team needs to take credit for that. Aaron, who co-ordinated our childcare arrangements, which was greatly appreciated by attendees, Brittany whose excellent accountancy skills kept us very well budgeted, Michael whose social media prowess ensured we trended nationally, George who provided a helping hand where it was needed, Erin who was our Rego super-hero, Josh who helped us keep ZooKeepr and our payment gateway under control, Daniel our stellar volunteer co-ordinator and Brett whose photographic talents and video production blew us away – every single person was part of an amazing, productive, motivated and awesome team that I was so incredibly proud to be a part of.

LCA2016 - Wednesday

Installing the Wacom Intuos Pro PTH-651 under Ubuntu 13.10

As a present to myself for getting a high distinction while studying my IT Masters, I decided to get a reasonable graphics tablet. As a hobbyist graphic designer and photographer, it was an area I was keen to develop skills in. In determining which model to buy, Wacom was really the only choice – they are the undisputed market leader in this space. The Bamboo range wasn’t function enough for what I wanted, so opted for the mid-range Intuos Pro model, the PTH-651.

The lovely folks at BCC Computers in Geelong put one on backorder (apparently they’re really popular, they kept chasing for me, which was great) and within a couple of weeks I had the device in my hot little hands. It’s just as well that it arrived after linux.conf.au 2014, otherwise I wouldn’t have packed for conf!

The other complication was that I had a Masters’ assignment due; my wonderful work colleague T played Dad and ‘kept it safe’ for me for the week or so until the assignment was finished; then my toy got released! Thanks, T 🙂

Installation under Windows

The tablet installed beautifully under both Windows 8, my home machine, and my work laptop running Win 7 Professional. In both cases I had to reboot, but the software installed easily and immediately I was able to use it.

Getting it installed under Ubuntu 13.10 Saucy Salamander

Installation under Ubuntu was a little more tricky. The good folk at BCC had warned me that I would have to use this difficult thing called the ‘command line’ when I made initial enquiries; this was where I pulled out the photo of my “other” Nexus 4 running Ubuntu Touch and demonstrated this was probably within my capability!

Nexus 4 runnung Ubuntu Touch

I was not to be deterred.

So, after unpacking and installing the Intuos under Windows, I booted into Ubuntu and set to work. Initially, there was nothing. Not even a hesistant jitter from the cursor to indicate it knew of the Intuos, and the Intuos knew of it.

After some reading on the Ubuntu forums, I happened across instructions for downloading, compiling and installing the latest version of the Wacom drivers, from the Linux Wacom project. I’d had mixed results backporting previously, like when I had to backport the Atheros ethernet drivers into my ASUS N76.

This time, fortune was on my side. The new drivers installed perfectly and after a reboot, my Intuos was recognised, and the (still somewhat limited, but vastly improved) control panel was in System Settings.

Mission: accomplished

Other thoughts

Everything about this install was intuitive, other than for changing the nibs on the stylus, which Wacom had helpfully done a video of.

Will my mouse be gone foreover? I’m not sure. Going entirely to the tablet takes a little time and practise, but just like learning a language it’s a skill I’d like to get some more fluency in. I still have a lot to learn with swipes and other gestures, but for now I’m off to a flying start.

Wrap up of BarCampMelbourne 2013

With huge thanks to Pomke and the team at Small World for lending us their fabulous Causeway House Boardroom venue, BarCampMelbourne 2013 got off to a great start.

Pomke on Angular JS

The talks I got to see where many and varied. First up, Pomke spoke to us about Angular JS and using node.js on the backend – moving processes to the client. This is becoming less of an issue with powerful browsers.

Steve on programmable logic controllers

Steve spoke to us about process control systems – and how they present a number of security risks. PLC – programmable logic controllers – drive inputs and outputs on machinery – essentially replacing buttons and switches and dials. They are programmed in ladder logic, and the PLC scans through the logic continuously – evaluating and acting on logical conditions. PLCs are low end devices in terms of capacity and communications – and could still run on 9600 baud RS232. SCADA systems are generally proprietary and generally only run on Microsoft Windows. There are risks here – such as the Stuxnet virus which was exploited before USB keys. These systems were born in the days before security was an issue, and this means that there are ways to interface remotely with many of these devices – as you have to be able to get into them to diagnose them and repair them if required. Another issue they found was that the equipment was only capable of running at 10mbps – which made it vulnerable to TCP broadcast storms.

Marc Cheong on teaching with engagement

Marc told us the story of how he became an accidental teacher – having started his PhD, falling into a tutoring role, he discovered the knack of engaging students. In his role, he found that students weren’t engaged – they wouldn’t learn anything. When exploring the underpinning causes he found that there is a paradigm shift involved in adult learning – it is self-directed, not spoon-fed. Students felt like a cog in a huge machine, and lecturers weren’t paying them very much individual attention. To remedy this problem he chose to ‘engage with empathy’ – learning everyone’s first name, ensuring icebreakers to reduce the feelings of isolation and building bonds between the class and the teacher.

He explained that the theory chained low motivation with low engagement to result in low marks – so the key to better marks is engagement and motivation – making the learning process fun and making people proud of their work.

Alec Clews on the ICT education crisis

Alec spoke about the challenges of ICT education in Victoria – there is a skills shortage, but the skills people are leaving the education system with are not great. Much of the proposed ICT curriculum should be in other parts of the curriculum and not in ICT education. For instance ethics and being safe online really belows in citizenship, while data interpretation and modelling really belongs in humanities. We need more of a focus on programming – and there was a strong sentitment in the room that visual programming is a copout. We also need more co-ordination between subjects – such as writing databases for humanities. We need to bring hacker skills into woodwork through 3D printing etc – using low cost accessible devices such as the Raspberry Pi. These devices will be a huge enabler for education.

computingatschool.org.au

Trystan on robot design choices

Trystan spoke about robot design choices, and what sort of need or objective your robot was serving and what sort of senses your robot should have. This allows you to make key design decisions so that you can build a robot to your desired budget. Once your robot has sensors, it needs some form of brain to blue all the pieces together. Microcontrollers are one way to make this happen – and you might have to design your own controller using a field programmable array (FPGA).

Lars Yencken on the quantified self

This was one of my favourite presentations of BarCamp, around the quantified self. Lars explained that everytime we use someone’s website to record something they are tracking what we are doing – but it is harder for us to capture this information about ourselves. The ideal situation would be that we have an agent measuring what we do, and providing useful advice such as ‘don’t drink that coffee because it will interrupt your sleep patterns’ based on the gathered data. Lars explained how the key areas he was trying to quantify were food and weight, but one of the challenges he had was balancing the need for bookkeeping with getting value out of doing it.

The key takeaway from me was that the mere act of measuring can serve to change behaviour – such as getting more exercise or eating fewer calories.

He also went into details about some of the glitches experienced in quantifying the self – such as battery life, GPS glitches and difficulties exporting data captured over long time periods.

One tool he mentioned that looks interesting is Huginn – which helps to measure changes in behaviour.

 

A huge shout out to to sponsors No ISP for helping make the day happen – their business model for an ISP co-operative is interesting indeed.