My talk picks for #lca2017 – linux.conf.au

linux.conf.au 2017 heads to Hobart, where it was last held in 2009. I absolutely love Tasmania – especially its food and scenery – and am looking forward to heading over.

So, here’s my talk picks  – keeping in mind that I’m more devops than kernel hacker – so YMMV.

Executive Summary

  • Monday 16th – Networking breakfast, possibly some WootConf sessions and / or Open Knowledge Miniconf sessions.
  • Tuesday 17th – Law and policy Miniconf, Community Leadership Summit
  • Wednesday 18th – Future Privacy by Michael Cordover, In Case of Emergency – Break Glass by David Bell, Handle Conflict Like a Boss by Deb Nicholson, Internet of Terrible Things by Matthew Garrett.
  • Thursday 19th – Network Protocols for IoT Devices by Jon Oxer, Compliance with the GPL by Karen Sandler and Bradley M. Kuhn, Open source and innovation by Allison Randall and Surviving the next 30 years of open source by Karen Sandler.
  • Friday 20th – Publicly releasing government models by Audrey Lobo-Pulo

Monday 16th January

I’m keeping Monday open as much as possible, in case there are last minute things we need to do for the Linux Australia AGM, but will definitely start the day with the Opening Reception and Networking Breakfast. A networking breakfast is an unusual choice of format for the Professional Delegates Networking Session (PDNS), but I can see some benefits to it such as being able to initiate key relationships and talking points early in the conference. The test of course will be attendance, and availability of tasty coffee 😀

If I get a chance I’ll see some of the WootConf sessions and/or Open Knowledge Miniconf sessions (the Open Knowledge Miniconf schedule hadn’t been posted at the time of writing).

Tuesday 17th January

The highlight for me in Tuesday’s schedule is the excellent Pia Waugh talking ‘Choose your own Adventure‘. This talk is based on Waugh’s upcoming book, and the philosophical foundations, macroeconomic implications and strategic global trends cover a lot of ground – ground that needs to be covered.

As of the time of writing, the schedule for the Law and Policy Miniconf hadn’t been released, but this area is of interest to me – as is the Community Leadership Summit. I’m interested to see how the Community Leadership Summit is structured this year; in 2015 it had a very unconference feel. This was appropriate for the session at the time, but IMHO what the Community Leadership Summit needs to move towards are concrete deliverables – such as say a whitepaper advising Linux Australia Council on where efforts should be targeted in the year ahead. In this way, the Summit would be able to have a tangible, clear impact.

Wednesday 18th January

I’ll probably head to Dan Callahan’s keynote on ‘Designing for failure’. It’s great to see Jonathan Corbet’s Kernel Report get top billing, but my choice here is between the ever-excellent Michael Codover’s ‘Future Privacy‘ and Cedric Bail’s coverage of ‘Enlightenment Foundation Libraries for Wearables‘. Next up, I’ll be catching David Bell (Director, LCA2016) talking ‘In case of emergency – break glass – BCP, DRP and Digital Legacy‘. There’s nothing compelling for me in the after lunch session, except perhaps Josh Simmon’s ‘Building communities beyond the black stump‘, but this one’s probably too entry-level for me, so it might be a case of long lunch / hallway track.

After afternoon tea, I’ll likely head to Deb Nicholson’s ‘Handle conflict like a boss‘, and then Matthew Garett‘s ‘Internet of terrible things‘ – because Matthew Garrett 😀

Then, it will be time for the Penguin Dinner!

Thursday 19th January

First up, I’m really looking forward to Nadia Eghbal’s ‘People before code‘ keynote about the sustainability of open source projects.

Jon Oxer’s ‘Network Protocol Analysis for IoT Devices‘ is really appealing, particularly given the rise and rise of IoT equipment, and the lack of standards in this space.

It might seem like a dry topic for some, but Bradley M. Kuhn and Karen Sandler from the Software Freedom Conservancy will be able to breathe life into ‘Compliance with the GPL‘ if anyone can; they also bring with them considerable credibility on the topic.

After lunch, I’ll be catching Allison Randall talking on ‘Open source and innovation‘ and then Karen Sandler on ‘Surviving the next 30 years of open source‘. These talks are related, and speak to the narrative of how open source is evolving into different facets of our lives – how does open source live on when we do not?

Friday 20th January

After the keynote, I’ll be catching Audrey Lobo-Pulo on ‘Publicly releasing government models‘ – this ties in with a lot of the work I’ve been doing in open data, and government open data in particular. After lunch, I’m looking forward to James Scheibner’s ‘Guide to FOSS licenses‘, and to finish off the conference on a high note, the ever-erudite and visionary George Fong on ‘Defending the security and integrity of the ‘Net’. Internet Australia, of which Fong is the chair, has many values in common with Linux Australia, and I foresee the two organisations working more closely together in the future.

What are your picks for #lca2017?

Go Girl – Go for IT! 2008

The ‘Go Girl – Go for IT!’ event was held at Deakin University’s Burwood campus on 28-29th October and saw over 1200 secondary school girls attend dozens of presentations by women in IT, who spoke of their career directions and aspirations.  Organised by Victorian Women in ICT, the event aims to attract female middle secondary students into a career in information and communications technology – and to explain some of the subject choices they need to make to get there.

Having participated in BarCampMelbourne and Software Freedom Day, I was motivated to assist with Go Girl – Go for IT! Both BarCamp and SFD engender (no pun intended) a strong sense of community, have a strong freedom ethos and a determination to break down barriers to participation – all things shared by GGGIT. While the workload was overwhelming at first, and the days themselves were both stressful and exciting it’s definitely something I’d jump at the chance to be involved with again.

As a learning opportunity the presentations offered a number of insights.

  • Know your audience: Some of the presenters (I won’t mention names) tried to be edgy or hip with their presentations, and used swear words and other shock tactics to engage the audience – even though there was little substance to their presentation.  There is an appropriate context for swearing  and presenting to 15, 16 and 17 year olds is not an appropriate context. Substance first, flashy stuff second.
  • Know your audience: Some of the better presenters were both interesting and interested – interesting to watch and genuinely interested in the aspirations and dreams of their audience. Passion is something that you can’t fake.
  • Know your audience: Some presenters were the total opposite of hip – and downright boring to watch. 15 year old girls are not business analysts or programmers – and a data flow diagram is not going to engage them.

Observations from the day included;

  • Similar to BarCampMelbourne, I noticed that the majority of presenters were Mac rather than PC based – and not just those who were heavily into graphic arts, animation or video. It appears there is definitely an increasing takeup of MacOS.
  • Girls from schools with a lower socio-economic background appeared to appreciate the day and the presenters more than private schools – it was interesting that I was not the only volunteer to make this observation. The only conclusion I can draw here is that the private schools are afforded more similar opportunities – therefore appreciate them less.
  • Many of the regional schools had to arrive late and leave early because of the distance they had to travel – however many of them did make the effort to come which was pleasing to see.

For me personally, the stand out presentations were;

  • Pia Waugh: Of Software Freedom Day International and One Laptop Per Child fame, Pia spoke on how a career in ICT can provide all the things you want from a job – money, travel, interesting work etc. She went one level higher however and showed how the work that you can do can change the world.
  • Rebecca Cannon: Spoke on the Artabase site, that intends to be the next Facebook-style collaborative social networking site for artists all over the world.
  • Kylie Robertson: Discussed her work with Ish Media. This presentation was a hoot, as it showcased the Girl Friday serial that is downloadable on to mobile phones – and pioneered the way in mobile content.